08 August 2006

What is NT On-Access Scanner service, and how do I kill it?

Every time I boot up my laptop, it takes an inordinate amount of time, and then I get an error message saying there is a problem with this service. I don’t know what it is, don’t recall installing it, and want to get rid of it if it serves no function other than to gum up the works and then crash.

I’m tired of writing about the Middle East.

I’m reading Credo, by Jaroslav Pelikan. I’ve been urged to hurry up and finish it, as the Catholic chaplain wants to borrow it. Snicker. There is some really good stuff in here, which I never considered. I admit to knowing very little about the historical roots of Protestantism, despite having been raised as one. Zwingli makes me want to go back in time and smack him over the head. Luther has always bothered me. Don’t get me started on Calvin. I have coffee with the Prods on Friday evenings, since they have really good coffee. Well, that’s not the only reason. They are also really nice folks with a love for the Bible and a sincere (if theologically imprecise) love for Christ. So there is some common ground. I’m not turning into a fuzzy ecumenical type who is going to start espousing the branch theory of the Church, but let’s just say that I choose to look at similarities rather than differences for a couple hours out of the week. And one of them is looking into Orthodoxy, so we have some good discussions on theology. Anyway, one of them was relating a story about a friend of his who used God as an excuse for getting fired. “God wanted me to get fired,” when the guy relating the story said it probably had more to do with being late to work consistently and with no good reason. It just slipped out of me, “I betcha a quarter he’s a Calvinist.”

The fact that I was right is beside the point.

Anyway, Credo is giving me some insight into precisely where some of these beliefs came from and how they were historically expressed. Most fascinating is the squabbling between Calvinists and Lutherans over the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist, a belief that was never seriously disputed within the Church at any time from the time of St. Ignatius of Antioch (On Heresies, most likely composed in 96 AD, certainly before 107 AD when he reposed, which would be BEFORE much of the New Testament was written) until Zwingli came up with his abominable heresy. Then again, one of the changes in mindset going from Protestantism to Orthodoxy was learning that theological innovation is always suspect. The idea that the Church in its entirety, beginning even before the repose of the last of the 12 Apostles, could lapse into heresy on this utterly vital point (as happened if one believes Zwingli, Calvin, and their supporters) is literally inconceivable to me at this stage in life.

Also of interest, but worthy of greater discussion is the disconnect between Reformation soteriology and every-day life which requires the Second Helvetic Confession of 1566 to condemn both the idea that good works are necessary to salvation and the idea that good works detrimental to salvation. So which is it? But trying to pin down Westerners on soteriological ideas is generally a bad idea because of the way the first reformers worked from a single standpoint, being unable or unwilling to formulate a balanced concept of Christ saving the whole of man. This involves the transformation of soul, mind, and body and the expression of this transformation in the Christian's life. To take any one aspect of this transfiguration and saying 'this, and this alone is salvation' is taking a partial and skewed look at what is really a lifelong process of walking with Christ. Blame it on Augustine and Anselm. I do.

2 Comments:

Blogger Tim Covington said...

I looked up your "NT On-Access Scanner" on the microsoft support site. From the articles there, it looks to be a part of your anti-virus software. You might want to check with the manufacturer (of the AV software) and see if they have a solution.

10:14 PM  
Anonymous Nerdasaaurus said...

But trying to pin down Westerners on soteriological ideas is generally a bad idea because of the way the first reformers worked from a single standpoint, being unable or unwilling to formulate a balanced concept of Christ saving the whole of man.

You: me: beer and much discussion....as soon as is rational.

5:15 AM  

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